Such as These

Parenting is hard. I know this truth as well as anyone. I get daily lessons on how far I have to go to improve as a parent.

There are benefits to working where my kids are, but there are also challenges. Much like the cobbler’s wife goes longest without shoes, my own kids go longest without my attention at school. If you’ve spent any time at all on our campus, you’ve likely seen the Browne girls sitting by themselves in the hallway waiting for Dad to finish with a meeting.

Such was the case the week after classes ended this year. I was busy meeting with teachers one on one for year-end reviews, and my girls were on their own. My oldest had volleyball camp, and she was supposed to bring my youngest daughter, Sara, over with her to meet me. I had a meeting ending at the same time, so I told my sweet little Sara to wait for me in the gym with the volleyball campers.

Of course, my meetings ran late: 5 minutes turned into 10, and 10 minutes turned into 30, and 30 minutes turned into 60 (such is the life of a school administrator!) When the meetings finally ended, I rushed out of my office to track down poor Sara, who had to wait for me in the gym by herself for over an hour. I was sickened at the thought.

Only I entered the gym to find Sara was not lonely and by herself. The teens who were running the camp – one an alumni who just finished up her freshman year of college, and the other a senior and co-captain of the volleyball team – had seen Sara by herself, and had acted: they had included her in their camp with girls much older than her, and were giving her odd jobs to help the campers run through their drills. Sara, having been included by the “cool teen girls,” was grinning ear to ear when I found her.

Mark 10:14-15 reads in part, “[Jesus] said to them, ‘Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of God. Assuredly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will by no means enter it.’” One of my favorite things about being part of a K-12 school community are the many positive interactions I see daily between our teens and Grammar School kids. Teenagers who lay down their lives in little ways to serve the little children in our school change lives. In 20 years, I doubt Sara will remember the 7 kings of Rome, but I have no doubt she will remember the day those two teenage girls went out of their way to include her so she didn’t feel alone.

Kingdom work was done that day, and I, fallible father that I am, was largely the recipient. Soli Deo Gloria

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